Seamanship: including names of principal parts of a ship; masts, sails, yards, etc

by Sir George S. Nares. by George S Nares

Publisher: Griffin & Co in Portsmouth

Written in English
Published: Pages: 334 Downloads: 161
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Subjects:

  • Navigation.,
  • Seamanship.,
  • Navalart and science.

Edition Notes

Includes index.

ContributionsWalker, T. P.
The Physical Object
Paginationviii, 334 p. :
Number of Pages334
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19976966M

Name the principal parts of a typical sailboat and runabout. (pgs. SSM) b. Name the principal parts of the masts, booms, spars, standing and running rigging and sails of a gaff or Marconi rigged sloop, schooner, and ketch or yawl. (pg. SSM) c. Describe the identifying characteristics of a sloop, ketch, yawl, cutter, and schooner. Sailing: Name the principal parts of the masts, booms, spars, standing and running rigging, and sails of a gaff- or Marconi-rigged sloop, schooner, and ketch or yawl. Describe the identifying characteristics of a sloop, ketch, yawl, cutter, and schooner. Excerpt from Seamanship: Including Names of Principal Parts of a Ship; Masts, Sails, Yards, Etc.; Bends and Hitches; Manufacture and Tests of Steel Wire Rope; Flexible Steel Wire Save new. A complete set of nautical tables, containing all that are requisite, with the Nautical almanac, in keeping a ship's reckoning at sea, and in ascertaining the latitude and longitude by celestial observations; including a new, accurate, and extensive table of the latitudes and longitudes of the principal ports, harbours, capes, etc. in the world.

  —A portion of the hold in the after-part of a ship, corresponding with the fore-peak. After-sails.—All the canvas on the main and mizzen-masts of a fullrigged ship and barque, and on the main-mast of a brig. After-timbers.—All the timbers abaft the midship part of a ship. After-yards.—The main and mizzen-yards of a full-rigged ship. "Nomenclature of Naval Vessels" has been prepared primarily for use in the apprentice schools at the various navy yards and stations. It is believed, however, that it will be found useful for reference purposes by engineers, draftsmen, inspectors, and others interested in the construction of naval vessels. Before they graduated into the Navy, these lads had to know the principal parts of a ship, the names and uses of all the sails, spars, and riggings. Electrician Rate but not on the. USS Vandalia. The Electrician rate is established when the Trenton becomes the first electrical ship. It had a KW generator for lighting only. Sailing: Name the principal parts of the masts, booms, spars, standing and running rigging, and sails of a gaff- or Mar­coni- rigged sloop, schooner, and ketch or yawl. Describe the identifying characteristics of a sloop, ketch, yawl, cutter, and schooner. Reference: Pages 5 .

Expressed as a fraction each of these represents a numerator of which the denominator is 1, For example,"S", the first letter in the message, would be the fraction /1,, and, to reduce the numerator to one in order to reduce the labor of the calculation, both the numerator and the denominator may be devided by the numerator, yielding: 1/, and so on for each letter of the message. A method of reducing sail by taking up the tack and lowering the peak on fore and aft sails. On a square rig ship the yards are not set square to the masts when the ship is at anchor, used as a sign for mourning or a death on board. Mid 19th cent.; alteration of .   Morning, What are the names of the gaffs circled in red below, are they Trisail gaffs? I have another drawing of the Enterprise around the same period that shows none of these, how often would they be employed? I understand the gaff NOT circled is . Sailing employs the wind—acting on sails, wingsails or kites—to propel a craft on the surface of the water (sailing ship, sailboat, windsurfer, or kitesurfer), on ice or on land over a chosen course, which is often part of a larger plan of navigation.. A course defined with respect to the true wind direction is .

Seamanship: including names of principal parts of a ship; masts, sails, yards, etc by George S Nares Download PDF EPUB FB2

Excerpt from Seamanship: Including Etc book of Principal Parts of a Ship; Masts, Sails, Yards, Etc.; Bends and Hitches; Manufacture and Tests of Steel Wire Rope; Flexible Steel Wire Hawsers; Tests and Weights of Hemp Rope, Flexible Steel Wire Hawsers, and Chain Cable Hawser laid rope.

Shroud laid rope. Cable laid rope. An eye splice. Fork and lashing s: 1. Seamanship; including names of principal parts of a ship masts, sails, yards, & c. Paperback – Author: George Strong Nares. Seamanship: Including Names of Principal Parts of a Ship; Masts, Sails, Yards, & C.

George Strong Nares. Griffin & Company, - Navigation - pages. 0 Reviews. Preview this book. sage ^/^7 1 '. — _ -=»=™^ ^^j seamanship: including names of principal parts op a ship; masts, sails, yards, etc.

; bends and hitches ; manufacture and tests of steel wire rope; flexible steel wire hawsers; tests and weights of hemp rope, flexible steel wire hawsers, and chain cable; splicing wire rope; knots and splices; fittings of standing rigging; rigging of masts; yards and bowsprit; tests of blocks.

NAMES OF MASTS SAILS AND YARDS. 6: PARTS OF A MAST BOWSPRIT AND YARD. 9: Seamanship: Including Names of Principal Parts of a Ship Seamanship: Including Names of Principal Parts of a Ship George S.

Nares No preview available. For the topsail yards, the block of a single whip is secured at the weather yard-arm, as the topsail yard has already as much downward strain as it can bear, both parts of the whip are taken as far aft as possible.

See a good strain on the weather lift-jigger, before hauling taut the preyenter brace. Including: names of principal parts of a ship, masts, sails yards etc, bends and hitches, knots and splices, fittings of standing rigging, rigging of masts, yards and bowsprit, fittings of tackles, staying masts, manouvers, to tack ship, trimming sails, rocket and life kite, tests and weights sails hemp, rope steel and much more.

Seamanship: Including Names of Principal Parts of a Ship; Masts, Sails, Yards, Etc.; Bends and Hitches; Manufacture and Tests of Steel Wire Rope; Flexible Steel Wire Hawsers; Tests and Weights of Hemp Rope, Flexible Steel Wire Hawsers, and Chain Cable.

George S. Nares. Buy Seamanship: Including names of principal parts of a ship, masts, sails, yards, & c 5th ed. rev. and corr by Nares, George S (ISBN:) from Amazon's Book Store. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible : George S Nares. Vice Amiral Sir George S.

Nares - Seamanship - Portsmouth, Griffin & Co, - pp - hardcover - 22 x 15 cm Condition: good See the photos. Bound in original green cloth hardcover boards with gilt decoration. Boards and board edges rubbed and bumped with some smudging.

Interior rather clean. Book block a bit shaken, but holding. Spine ends and inner hinges strenghtened. Complete with over. Seamanship including names of principal parts of a ship; masts, sails, yards, etc La spedizione artica dell'"Alert" e del "Discovery".

Traité de manoeuvre et de matelotage: voyage à la mer polaire sur les navires de S. l'Alerte et la Découverte ( à ). Sixth edition, enlarged and revised. Quarter bound with blue spine and green boards. The book has been professionally rebound but presumably some time ago as there is wear to the edges of the boards and to the spine; the original gilt spine label has been.

A sailing vessel with three masts, square-rigged on the fore and main and with only fore-and-aft sails on her mizzen mast. Boat. Any small open craft without decking and propelled by oars, sometimes assisted by a small lugsail on a short mast. Waterway – this planking extending all round the inside of a ship immediately above the beams.

Yards –a cylindrical wooden spar, tapering to each end, secured across a ship’s mast from which a sail is hung. Half yards of gaffs were on the aft side of the mast or on stays or booms.

A fore-and-aft sail is a sail not set on a yard. Seamanship: including names of principal parts of a ship. Author Nares, George S.

(George Strong), Published a. Name the principal parts of a typical sailboat and a runabout. Describe the identifying characteristics of a sloop, ketch, yawl, cutter, and schooner. Demonstrate the ability to use a heaving line.

Service. Log at least 8 hours of work on ship equipment, projects, or activities other than ship meetings, parties, dances, or fun. Name the principal parts of a typical sailboat and a runabout. Name the principal parts of the masts, booms, spars, standing and running rigging, and sails of a gaff- or Marconi-rigged sloop, schooner, and ketch or yawl.

Describe the identifying characteristics of a File Size: KB. 23 less liable to kinks and grinds when new, and is allowed, in the navy, for reeving off lower and topsail braces.

Shroud-laid. Rope, Fig. 16, Plate 7, is formed by adding another strand to the plain-laid the four spirals of strands leave a hollow in the centre, which, if unfilled, would, on the application of strain, permit the strands to sink in, and detract greatly from the rope.

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Seamanship: including names of principal parts of a ship; masts, sails, yards, & c. Author Nares, George S. (George Strong), Published. The same is true of the yards, the stays, the halyards and every other part of a ship’s rigging and so the seemingly complicated maze becomes very simple, for all you have to do is to learn the names of the various parts on one mast and prefix fore, main or mizzen to them for those on the other masts.

Name the principal parts of the type of craft commonly used by your ship. Know the proper display of boat flags and courtesy on small boats. Demonstrate your ability to handle a rowboat.

Reference: Pages – ; – ; – and Rowing merit badge pamphlet, No. Marlinspike Seamanship: Using lineFile Size: KB. Maritim ordbogs kilder Masting and Rigging - Rudimentary Treatise on Masting, Mast-Making and Rigging of Ships, Robert Kipping,Technical Press, London, [] M47K, Seamanship including names of principal parts, G.

Nares, 5th ed.,Griffin & Co. Name the principal parts of a typical sailboat and a runabout. Name the principal parts of the masts, booms, spars, standing and running rigging, and sails of a gaff- or Marconi-rigged sloop, schooner, and ketch or yawl.

Describe the identifying characteristics of a sloop, ketch, yawl, cutter, and schooner. Shiploading - A Picture Dictionary; Ships named for Individual Sailors. Ships named for Individual Sailors - Citations A backstay extends from the upper part of the mast to the ship's side at some distance abaft the mast.

BALLAST - Heavy weights packed into the bottom of a ship to give her stability. rather than weight. The internal. Parts of a Sailing Frigate Ship - Leagues under the Sea - Jules Verne Teacher Resources Teacher Resources for our Living Books Curri. Tall Ships and Maritime History - Mainmast Diagram of a Tall Ship - Diagram of a square rigged man of war sailing ship, with its nomenclature or Details and names of items on a sailing ship's main mast.

Name the principal parts of a typical sailboat and a runabout. Name the principal parts of the masts, booms, spars, standing and running rigging, and sails of a gaff- or Marconi-rigged sloop, schooner, and ketch or yawl.

Describe the identifying characteristics of a. Author of Narrative of a voyage to the Polar Sea during in H.M.

ships 'Alert, The Official Report of the Recent Arctic Expedition, and SeamanshipBorn: The sail is of the Arab cut, with several feet of luff below the heel of the yard.

It is invariably set on the starboard side, and the tack, as in the Adriatic lugsail, is carried well off towards the gunwale in order to keep the sail off the mast and prevent a back-sail when on the starboard tack.

Point out the various boat types in real life, and if necessary in the book. Ask what the distinguishing characteristics are. Name the principal parts of the masts, booms, spars, standing and running rigging, and sails of a gaff- or Marconi-rigged sloop, schooner, and ketch or yawl.

(Reference pp. ) Mast(s) Forestay. Backstay. Shrouds. Seamanship: Continued A. Boats 6A1. Types and uses. Boats used by the United States Navy are divided into two general classes: power boats, and (2) pulling boats (propelled by oars). As a war measure, the number and types of boats carried aboard naval vessels have been reduced greatly, the largest ships carrying not more than two boats, or possibly four in the case of aircraft carriers.Vessel with three or more masts with square sails on the fore mast and fore and aft sails on the after mast.

Generally in the range of - ton capacity. A well-preserved example of a commercial Barque is the Falls of Clyde. Built init is now preserved as a museum ship in Honolulu, Hawaii. Additionally, the United States Coast Guard.B. Return to top. BACK BAR: Used for the same purpose but on the opposite side to a bosom bar.

BACK BOARD: A portable back support nicely designed and fitted on the after side of the stern thwart in a small motor or row boat. BACK STAY: Stays which extend from all mast levels, except the lower, to the ship's side at some distance abaft the mast.

They serve as additional supports to prevent.